Kentucky – $2.7 Million in Funding to Breckenridg

Lt. Gov. Coleman Announces More Than $2.7 Million in Funding to Breckenridge, Grayson and Meade Counties

LEITCHFIELD / HARDINSBURG / BRANDENBURG, KY (STL.News)  Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman awarded $2,771,935 in funding to Breckenridge, Grayson and Meade counties.  The funding comes through Gov. Andy Beshear’s Cleaner Water Program.

“Kentucky families deserve clean water – a basic human right – as well as access to safe and well-maintained roads, educational opportunities and support when they need help,” said Gov. Beshear.  “Today’s investments show what we can accomplish when we put our values into action.”

“Investments in infrastructure, like high-speed internet, clean water, roads and bridges provide Kentucky a solid foundation for building tomorrow’s economy, today,” said Lt. Gov. Coleman.

As part of Gov. Beshear’s Better Kentucky Plan, the Cleaner Water Program is funded by the American Rescue Plan Act and administered by the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority (KIA), $250 million was appropriated at the close of the 2021 General Assembly through a bipartisan agreement for clean drinking water and wastewater grants to fund projects across Kentucky.  The Lincoln Trail Area Development District submitted the funding request for this project to the KIA.

Breckenridge County

  • $450,000 was awarded to the City of Hardinsburg to replace the Mattingly lift station.
  • $152,039 was awarded to the City of Cloverport to upgrade the Cloverdale pump station.
  • $150,000 was awarded to the City of Irvington to rehab 25 manholes.

Hardinsburg Mayor Wayne Macy and the City Council of Hardinsburg said:  “We would like to express our appreciation and thank Gov. Beshear and the legislators for their collaborative work in securing funds to the City of Hardinsburg for the Cleaner Water Program.  It is great to know that our leaders in our state understand the needs of smaller cities and work as a team to support our endeavors to provide improved services to our residents.”

“The City of Irvington appreciates the allotment of funding for the smaller cities in the Commonwealth of Kentucky,” Irvington Mayor Yvonne Kennedy said.  “The funds received for the City of Irvington will update and enhance ongoing projects within the city.”

Grayson County

  • $409,305 was awarded to Grayson County Water District for improvements to Caneyville water system.
  • $306,500 was awarded to the City of Leitchfield for upgraded customer meters.
  • $166,112 was awarded to Edmonson County Water District for improved service to 1,500 households and new service to four households.
  • $63,642 was awarded to the City of Caneyville to replace water lines.
  • $25,000 was awarded to the City of Clarkson to purchase three new pumps and new water testing supplies.

“The city appreciates this funding and will use it to make needed improvements to our sewer system,” said Clarkson Mayor Scotty Gore.

Meade County

  • $549,337 was awarded to Meade County Water District to extend water lines and provide service to 23 unserved households.
  • $350,000 was awarded to the City of Brandenburg to replace 6,000 linear feet of water lines.
  • $150,000 was awarded to the City of Muldraugh to rehab 15,000 linear feet of sewer mains.

“I’d like to thank the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, their staff and all others who made this funding and today possible,” said Judge/Executive Leslie Stith.  “On behalf of Meade County, the Meade County Water District, the City of Brandenburg and the City of Muldraugh, we are very grateful to receive this funding to move our sewer and water needs forward.  These funds will truly serve the citizens of Meade County, the City of Brandenburg, and the City of Muldraugh while addressing needed projects so they may become a reality.”

“The City of Brandenburg is very grateful to have received these funds at a very opportune time for our city,” Brandenburg Mayor Ronnie Joyner said.  “As the City of Brandenburg continues to grow, these funds will aid in the improvement of our infrastructure for continued growth within our city.  We are excited to continue to provide our consumers with reliable and professional service that they have come to know and trust.”

“At this time, with so many local governments dealing with failing infrastructure, Muldraugh is very fortunate to be awarded the grant,” Muldraugh Mayor Joseph E. Noon Sr. said.  “Our sewer system was built in 1958, and since has only been partially rehabilitated in 2008.  It is old and it needs to be maintained and fully rehabilitated.  Being awarded this grant will tremendously help the City of Muldraugh to accomplish a much-needed infrastructure improvement.  A special thank you to Gov. Beshear, Sen. Steve Meredith, Rep. Nancy Tate, Sen. Brett Guthrie and everyone that helped make this possible.”

About the Cleaner Water Program
More than $147 million has been awarded to grantees to fund transformative projects since the call for projects was announced June 1.  Eligible government agencies, such as city-owned water or sewer utilities, water commissions, water and sewer districts and counties, collaborated with their local Area Development Districts and Area Water Management Councils to submit projects for Cleaner Water Program funding.  There are 713 public drinking water and wastewater utilities in Kentucky.

Cleaner Water Program funding is allocated in three ways:

  • $150 million based on each county’s proportion of the state’s population, with the exception of Jefferson County’s share, which is discounted by 50% based on its high per capita allocation from the federal act.  A list of the allocations by county can be found here.
  • $50 million is available for utilities to provide drinking water services to unserved, rural customers or to utilities under a federal consent decree.  The KIA shall consider social, economic and environmental benefits in determining the allocations.
  • $49.9 million is available to supplement a project grant for a project with a cost in excess of a county’s allocation amount and other available grant sources.  The social, economic and environmental benefits shall be considered in determining project allocations.  KIA will receive $75,000 to administer the grant program.

The American Society of Civil Engineers in 2019 projected that Kentucky faces nearly $14.5 billion in water/wastewater infrastructure needs over the next 20 years, including over $8.2 billion in drinking water upgrades and $6.2 billion in sewer system improvements.

Information about the Cleaner Water Program, as well as grants for high-speed internet expansion, school facility upgrades and vocational education center renovations, can be found at governor.ky.gov/BetterKy.