Connecticut Governor Extends Severe Cold Weather Protocol

Governor Lamont Extends State’s Severe Cold Weather Protocol Through February 2, Urges Residents To Prepare for Below Normal Temperatures for Next Two Weeks

HARTFORD, CT (STL.News) Governor Ned Lamont announced that due to trends in the forecast indicating that temperatures in Connecticut will generally average about 10 degrees below normal for the next two weeks, he is directing the state’s severe cold weather protocol – which he activated on Friday, January 14 – to remain in effect through noon on Wednesday, February 2, 2022.  It was originally set to expire on Wednesday, January 19.

Current forecasts are indicating that over the next two weeks, highs in the state are generally expected to be in the 20s, with lows in the single digits or teens.  At times, the state may experience a few arctic outbreaks during which highs may only reach about 10 degrees, and lows dipping to between -10 and -20 degrees.

“It’s appearing that over the next couple of weeks we’re going to experience temperatures that are even colder than what is normal for this time of year, in addition to the potential for multiple winter storms,” Governor Lamont said.  “This long-duration severe cold weather can be life threatening if someone is outdoors for extended periods of time.  Shelters are open across the state, and I urge anyone in need to get connected to these services.  If you or someone you know is in need of shelter, call 2-1-1 and they will direct you to a nearby location and can also provide transportation if needed.”

The purpose of the severe cold weather protocol is to ensure that the most vulnerable populations receive protection from the severe cold conditions.  While enacted, a system is set up for state agencies and municipalities to coordinate with United Way 2-1-1 and Connecticut’s network of shelters to make sure that anyone in need can receive shelter, including transportation to shelters.

The following actions are implemented while the protocol is enacted:

  • The Connecticut Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection’s Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security activates its WebEOC communications network, which is an internet-based system that enables local, regional, and state emergency management officials and first responders to share up-to-date information about a variety of situations and conditions.  The system is used to monitor capacity at shelters across the state, enabling 2-1-1 to act as a clearinghouse to assist in finding shelter space for those who need it.  Local officials, working through WebEOC, can alert 2-1-1 and the state when they open temporary shelters or warming centers.
  • The Connecticut Department of Social Services, Connecticut Department of Housing, and Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services coordinate with 2-1-1 and the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, along with community-based providers, to provide transportation for people seeking shelter.