Fort Mccoy: Jorge Mojocoa Indicted For Attempting To Entice

Fort Mccoy Man, Jorge Mojocoa Indicted For Attempting To Entice A 12-Year-Old Child To Engage In Sexual Activity

Ocala, FL (STL.News) United States Attorney Roger B. Handberg announces that a grand jury has returned an indictment charging Jorge Mojocoa (69, Fort McCoy) with attempted enticement of a minor to engage in sex. Mojocoa faces a mandatory minimum penalty of 10 years, and up to life, in federal prison, and a potential life term of supervised release. Mojocoa is being held in federal custody pending trial.

According to court documents, on March 30 and March 31, 2022, Mojocoa utilized emails, phone calls, and text messages to engage in conversations with an undercover agent who was posing online as the guardian of a 12-year-old child.  On March 30, 2022, Mojocoa advised the agent that he wished to have sex with the “child” and negotiated to pay $60 for oral sex.  On March 31, 2022, Mojocoa arrived at an agreed upon location with cash, candy for the “child,” and lubricant. He was arrested by law enforcement at that time.

An indictment is merely a formal charge that a defendant has committed one or more violations of federal criminal law, and every defendant is presumed innocent unless, and until, proven guilty.

This case was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations, the United States Secret Service, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, the Ocala Police Department, and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.  It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Tyrie K. Boyer.

This is another case brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.  Led by the United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims.

SOURCE: USDOJ.Today