Business

IBM Commits to Skill 30 Million People Globally by 2030

The company announces more than 170 new partnerships and program expansions in more than 30 countries across the Americas, Asia Pacific, Europe, Middle East, and Africa.

ARMONK, NY (STL.News) IBM (NYSE:?IBM)?today unveiled a groundbreaking commitment and global plan to provide 30 million people of all ages with new skills needed for the jobs of tomorrow by 2030. To achieve this goal, IBM is announcing a clear roadmap with more than 170 new academic and industry partnerships. In addition, the effort will leverage IBM’s existing programs and career-building platforms to expand access to education and in-demand technical roles.

“Talent is everywhere; training opportunities are not,” said Arvind Krishna, IBM Chairman, and CEO.  “This is why we must take big and bold steps to expand access to digital skills and employment opportunities so that more people – regardless of their background – can take advantage of the digital economy.  Today, IBM commits to providing 30 million people with new skills by 2030.  This will help democratize opportunity, fill the growing skills gap, and give new generations of workers the tools they need to build a better future for themselves and society.”

The difficulty employers worldwide face in finding skilled workers poses a significant hurdle to economic growth. According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), closing the global skills gap could add US$11.5 trillion to global GDP by 2028.  To help do so, according to the WEF, the public and private sectors need to collaborate on education and training that keeps pace with market demands, demographic changes, and technology progress.

A Program for Everyone

With diverse offerings and an adaptable approach, IBM’s education portfolio strives to be unique and compelling, reflecting IBM’s understanding that a one-size-fits-all approach does not work when it comes to education.  IBM’s programs range from technical education for teens at brick-and-mortar public schools and universities and extend to paid, on-site IBM internships and apprenticeships.  The company’s skills and education programs also pair IBM mentorships with learners and provide no-charge, customizable online curricula to aspiring professionals.

IBM’s plan to educate 30 million people relies on its broad combinations of programs and includes collaborations with universities and key government entities — including employment agencies. In addition, partnerships extend to NGOs, particularly those that focus on groups such as underserved youth, women, and military veterans.  In general, IBM’s efforts mobilize the private sector across the globe to open and expand opportunity pathways for underrepresented and historically disadvantaged communities.

Examples include:

  • In the United States, IBM will expand partnerships with several new partners, including Workforce Development Inc, National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), and OHUB, to offer training on the IBM SkillsBuild platform to successfully upskill, reskill, and best prepare the workforce for the future of work.
  • In India, IBM collaborates with the Haryana State Board of Technical Education and Uttar Pradesh State Council of Educational Research and Training (SCERT) to upskill youth from across the country.
  • In Japan, IBM partners with Osaka Municipal Government and Osaka Roudou Kyokai (NPO) to offer SkillsBuild for Job Seekers in Osaka Prefecture, helping them obtain IT skills and earn tech-related jobs. IBM’s curricula include introductions to AI and cloud computing, particularly for positions like help desk specialist, web developer, and data analyst.
  • In Latin America, IBM is partnering with Junior Achievement Americas to provide IBM SkillsBuild and IBM mentors to train women for web development and programming careers.
  • In Spain, IBM has partnered with Agencia para el Empleo del Ayuntamiento de Madrid (Madrid Council Employment Agency) to provide unemployed individuals with technical and professional skills through IBM SkillsBuild.  Some of the courses will include interpersonal skills, client engagement, web development, and cybersecurity.
  • In Hong Kong, IBM partnered with Vocational Training Council (VTC), the most extensive vocational and professional education and training provider for learners of all ages, to include IBM SkillsBuild as part of their core learning on tech-related skills.
  • In Nigeria, IBM partnered with Coca-Cola HBC to skill youth on workplace readiness skills and interpersonal skills.
  • In Sweden, IBM is working with War Child to provide STEM career readiness for women who have escaped war.

Said Martin Sundblad, Research Manager, and Co-Lead, European Skills Practice at IDC, “The digital transformation has come to a point where it reaches into all processes, functions and job roles across enterprises and organizations, and the need for training becomes imperative for societies to adapt.  Digital skills development, albeit in different scales and forms, is now required throughout the education system, in most business functions, and within the IT professional community in order not to jeopardize the investments made.  The IBM program has the size and reaches that will support this transition.”

Marty Smith

Marty Smith is the Editor in Chief and a founder of STL.News, DirectSourceNews.org, and St. Louis Restaurant Review. As Editor in Chief, Smith is responsible for the content posted on the network with the help of the publishing team, which is located around the globe. Additionally, Smith is responsible for building a network of aggregator sites to manage the content involving thousands of sources.