Carl Young Charged with Drug Trafficking Offenses

Convicted Felon, Carl Young Charged with Drug Trafficking Offenses After Incident That Seriously Injured Two Victims

(STL.News) Carl Young, Jr., 41, of Indianapolis, appeared in federal court today to face charges of possession with the intent to distribute cocaine and marijuana, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime.

According to court documents, on February 16, 2022, Young was arrested by officers from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department after allegedly stealing a vehicle, fleeing from police, and crashing into another car.  The occupants of the other vehicle were ejected during the crash and suffered serious injuries.  Young allegedly had cocaine, approximately six pounds of marijuana, and a loaded shotgun inside the stolen vehicle, which police seized.  Young has numerous prior felony convictions, including three convictions for operating a vehicle while intoxicated endangering a person within the last three years.

If convicted on the new federal charges, Young faces up to 20 years in prison for possession with the intent to distribute cocaine, up to 5 years in prison for possession with the intent to distribute marijuana, up to 10 years for possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, and up to life in prison for carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime.  A federal district judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Zachary A. Myers, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, IMPD Chief Randal Taylor and ATF Acting Special Agent in Charge for the Columbus Field Division, Timothy Canon, made the announcement.

The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives investigated this case.

U.S. Attorney Myers thanked Assistant United States Attorney Pamela S. Domash, who is prosecuting the case.

This case was part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone.  The Department of Justice reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement, and the local community to develop effective, locally based strategies to reduce violent crime.

A complaint is merely an allegation, and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

SOURCE: USDOJ.Today